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Department Of Radiology

Columbia University Medical Center offers early lung cancer detection to high risk patients

Lung cancer screening with computed tomography (CT) helps detect lung cancer at an early stage when it can be removed

completely and cured. CUMC lung cancer screening program offers high quality imaging with state-of-the-art CT equipment. Our program includes subspecialty-trained chest radiologists as well as board-certified pulmonologists, oncologists and thoracic surgeons based at New York Presbyterian Hospital, the only hospital in New York City on the US News and World Report Honor Roll.
Is lung cancer screening right for you?
The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated 20% decrease in lung cancer related mortality in current and former smokers age 55-74 screened with CT when compared to smokers who did not have CT screening. The American Lung Association recommends lung cancer screening for patients who meet these criteria. Other people at increased risk for lung cancer, such as current and former smokers in all age groups,  people with  strong family history of lung cancer, and people with asbestos exposure, may also benefit.

Lung cancer screening with CT saves lives

 

The National Lung Screening Trial
From: The National Cancer Institute
http://www.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials/noteworthy-trials/nlst

“The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) compared two ways of detecting lung cancer: low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) and standard chest X-ray. Both chest X-rays and low-dose helical CT scans have been used to find lung cancer early, but the effects of these screening techniques on lung cancer mortality rates had not been determined. NLST enrolled 53,454 current or former heavy smokers from 33 sites and coordinating centers across the United States.
In November 2010, the initial findings from the NLST were released. On June 29, 2011, the primary results were published online in the New England Journal of Medicine and appeared in the print issue on August 4, 2011. These findings reveal that participants who received low-dose helical CT scans had a 20.0 percent lower risk of dying from lung cancer than participants who received standard chest X-rays.”

How lung cancer screening works:

  • Please discuss lung cancer screening with your doctor and obtain a referral.
  • If you do not have a doctor, we will refer you to our Pulmonary Nodule Assessment Program for consultation where you will be seen by a pulmonary physician who can determine if CT lung cancer screening is right for you. If so, it can be performed the same day.
  • You can choose the location most convenient for you: Columbia University Radiology on W51st Street or Columbia University Medical Center on West 168th Street/Haven Ave.
  • Please contact your insurance carrier to determine if your policy covers lung cancer screening with CT. Otherewise, There is a fee of $300.

Frequently asked questions:

  • Will I be exposed to radiation?
    • Yes, CT requires the use of x-rays to generate images. Low-dose screening CT at CUMC utilizes less than 90% of the radiation dose used for an average diagnostic chest CT.
  • Can I get a lung cancer screening CT without a doctor’s order?
    • No, New York State law requires a physician referral for all imaging tests except mammography. If you do not have a physician, we can make an appointment for you with a lung specialist in the nodule clinic.
  • How will I be informed of the results?
    • Your screening CT will be interpreted by experienced, Board-certified radiologists. The report will be sent to your doctor, who will then discuss the result with you.
  • If an abnormality is found, does it mean I have cancer?
    • Not necessarily. Small nodules and other abnormalities are found in about 1 in 5 screening CT scans, but most of these turn out to be benign—not cancer. Additional tests, most commonly follow-up scans, may be necessary to separate these incidental nodules from early cancers.
  • What if you do find cancer?

The Center at Columbia University Medical Center includes lung specialists, surgeons, and oncologists specializing in lung cancer treatment who can advise you on your options.

The National Lung Screening Trial
From: The National Cancer Institute
http://www.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials/noteworthy-trials/nlst

“The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) compared two ways of detecting lung cancer: low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) and standard chest X-ray. Both chest X-rays and low-dose helical CT scans have been used to find lung cancer early, but the effects of these screening techniques on lung cancer mortality rates had not been determined. NLST enrolled 53,454 current or former heavy smokers from 33 sites and coordinating centers across the United States.
In November 2010, the initial findings from the NLST were released.  On June 29, 2011, the primary results were published online in the New England Journal of Medicine and appeared in the print issue on August 4, 2011.   These findings reveal that participants who received low-dose helical CT scans had a 20.0 percent lower risk of dying from lung cancer than participants who received standard chest X-rays.”

Location and key personnel

To make an appointment please call (212) 326 8505

Radiology
Columbia University
51 W51st Street

Columbia University Kreitchman Center
Alan Rosenfield Building R1
722 W 168th Street

Pulmonary Nodule Assessment Program
Herbert Irving Pavilion
Suite 310
161 Fort Washington Avenue
New York, NY 10032
(212) 305-1544
Dr. William A.  Bulman, MD

Location and Key personnel

To make an appointment please call (212) 326 8505

Radiology
Columbia University
51 W51st Street

Columbia University Kreitchman Center
Alan Rosenfield Building R1
722 W 168th Street

Pulmonary Nodule Assessment Program
Herbert Irving Pavilion
Suite 310
161 Fort Washington Avenue
New York, NY 10032
(212) 305-1544
Dr. William A.  Bulman, MD